Quantcast

Evolution for Windows

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
9 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Evolution for Windows

Aleks Wolff

Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win 7 x64. At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

 

Have a good weekend,

 

Thanks, Aleks

 

Dimex Sales, Inc.

P.O. Box 2776

Lodi, CA 95241

 

T. 209-334-1991 F. 209-644-6814 C. 209-484-7003

e-mail [hidden email]  www.dimexinc.com

 

 

DVBE/SB #31573

 

"SECOND TO NONE"

 

     Since 1986

 


_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Adam Tauno Williams


Aleks Wolff <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win 7
>x64.

I don't believe there is a build/version that is stable or current for Windows

>At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been
>successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

Just dive in and use it,  that is the only effective way to learn,  U can run a LINUX distro on Windows using VirtualBox.

Install VirtualBox
Install an openSUSE 11.4 VM
Start using it

--
Adam Tauno Williams
_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Tom Davies
Hi :)
The best way to learn Gnu&Linux is to jump into a test-drive with a LiveCd and explore it for yourself. 

You seem to have completed the first step of becoming familiar with how to get help, ie using forums and mailing lists.  Also i guess you are already familiar with OpenSource programs such as FireFox/Chrome/Opera instead of IE and LibreOffice/OpenOffice instead of MS Office. 

2nd step is to try a few "LiveCd sessions" to test-drive them on your machine without installing anything.  You could do this in a Virtual Machine to avoid needing to burn a Cd/Dvd to boot-up from.  Oddly we often say "LiveCd" even when using Usb-sticks, Memory-cards, Dvds.  The important point is that you set you bios's boot-order to look for the appropriate device before looking at the hard-drive.  When you boot-up a LiveCd the system that is installed on your hard-drive does not get affected.  You can try to save things onto your hard-drive but it's not easy to do so.  So, when you reboot back into the system that is on your hard-drive there is no trace of the LiveCd session (well, it doesn't bypass whatever tracking your isp does).  So a few LiveCd sessions are good for taking Gnu&Linux for a test-drive.  Notice that although Cd/dvd-drives are about 100 times slower than a hard-drive Gnu&Linux will still probably be faster than the Windows on the hard-drive.  This is partly due to the way it uses Ram more efficiently. 

3rd step is probably to try installing a distro on an old machine, if you have one lurking around in a cupboard, or in an attic or can rescue one from some offices or from a skip or something.  You probably don't need to do this step but it's a good way of getting used to installing an OS if you haven't tried doing that before.  Also it gives you a chance to test a lot of different ways of installing.  Dual-boot is the best one to try first imo.  Another advantage of trying on an old machine is to show how much faster Gnu&Linux tends to be and how well it can run even on an old machine.  You don't need to keep upgrading your machine so much and it allows you to access data that you might have thought was not worth spending the time to copy off an old machine. 

4th is probably to install as a dual-boot on your main machine.  Again this leaves the Windows side almost untouched.  Each time you boot-up you will get a choice of whether to use Gnu&Linux or Windows for that session.  I have a multi-boot with 3 versions of Gnu&Linux all able to share the same data quite easily.  To start with it's worth setting Windows as the default to boot into so that you only boot into Gnu&Linux when you choose to.  Later on you could switch back to having the Gnu&Linux as the default choice. 


Now when i want to install Gnu&Linux on a machine i do step 2 to check hardware compatibility.  On older machines and oddly enough on ultra-new machines too i sometimes have to try 2 or 3 different distros from different "families" to find one that behaves nicely.  Then when i find one i like on that machine i install as a dual-boot. 

The LiveCd session usually allows you to install while you are still trying out the LiveCd so it's easy to play games or surf the internet at the same time as installing the OS to the hard-drive. 

Step 2 and 4 can take as little as a couple of hours even on an old machine. 

Unlike Windows the install usually includes a bunch of useful programs with reasonable defaults.  Typically you can expect to find stuff to; surf the internet, make use of social networking, torrenting thing,  multi-media players, dvd/cd burner, office suite, games such as space invaders, chess, 'mahjong', suduko. 

Also, crucially, a "Package Manager" that has a search tool so that you can search for other programs or codecs, drivers, libraries, add-ons and things.  The package manager handles downloading, installing and updating for you.  Usually you wont need to reboot and once you have chosen a program it tends to give you the most up-to-date version so you wont need to update or apply patches or anything.  When you first install the OS you will probably want to update but this update runs through a package manager and updates all programs and everything all in one go. 

With Gnu&Linux you don't need to hunt around various different websites for things to install; worrying about whether they have been compromised or anything.  You can if you want but it is better to let the Package Manager handle all of that. 

The best way to learn Gnu&Linux is to jump into a test-drive with a LiveCd and explore it for yourself. 
Regards from
Tom :)


From: Adam Tauno Williams <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Sat, 20 August, 2011 18:17:21
Subject: Re: [Evolution] Evolution for Windows



Aleks Wolff <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win 7
>x64.

I don't believe there is a build/version that is stable or current for Windows

>At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been
>successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

Just dive in and use it,  that is the only effective way to learn,  U can run a LINUX distro on Windows using VirtualBox.

Install VirtualBox
Install an openSUSE 11.4 VM
Start using it

--
Adam Tauno Williams
_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Andre Klapper
In reply to this post by Aleks Wolff
Hi,

On Fri, 2011-08-19 at 16:45 -0700, Aleks Wolff wrote:
> Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win
> 7 x64.

As far as I know
https://live.gnome.org/Evolution/FAQ#Does_a_version_for_Microsoft.28R.2CTM.2CC.2Cwhatever.29_Windows.28R.2CTM.2CC.2Cwhatever.29_exist.3F
is up-to-date and 2.32 is the latest version for Windows available.

I don't think that there is a 3.0 version for Windows (yet?), as
Fridrich (who's been providing these packages) is busy with other stuff
(and he has created these Windows versions in his freetime).

> At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been
> successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

[Tom Davies already answered this part perfectly in his email.]

andre

--
mailto:[hidden email] | failed
http://blogs.gnome.org/aklapper | http://www.openismus.com

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Joakim Kargaard
In reply to this post by Aleks Wolff
Hi Aleks,

Yes, there is a version for Windows, but looks to be only 32bit. Maybe someone else can correct me if I am wrong.

With regard to learning Linux, not really the right forum, but will try to help. It really depends on what you are thinking of learning. You could get a dvd of Ubuntu or Fedora and play around. That will give you an idea of what the GUI looks like. If you want to play on the command line, then there are plenty of online ebooks/tutorials on various commands that you can use. But to some degree it is distro specific. I would suggest making a choice on distro and then learning/asking questions from there.

Hope that helps.

Kim

On 08/20/2011 01:45 AM, Aleks Wolff wrote:

Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win 7 x64. At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

 

Have a good weekend,

 

Thanks, Aleks

 

Dimex Sales, Inc.

P.O. Box 2776

Lodi, CA 95241

 

T. 209-334-1991 F. 209-644-6814 C. 209-484-7003

e-mail [hidden email]  www.dimexinc.com

 

 

DVBE/SB #31573

 

"SECOND TO NONE"

 

     Since 1986

 

_______________________________________________ evolution-list mailing list [hidden email] To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ... http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Akhil Laddha
In reply to this post by Andre Klapper
On Sat, 2011-08-20 at 22:12 +0200, Andre Klapper wrote:
> Hi,

> I don't think that there is a 3.0 version for Windows (yet?), as
> Fridrich (who's been providing these packages) is busy with other stuff
> (and he has created these Windows versions in his freetime).
>

Evolution 3.0.2
http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/windows:/mingw:/win32:/EXPERIMENTAL/openSUSE_Factory/noarch/

Read
http://fridrich.blogspot.com/2010/05/experimental-evolution-installer-for.html for how to install these rpms on windows

Regards,
Akhil

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list

signature.asc (205 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Tom Davies
In reply to this post by Joakim Kargaard
Hi :)
Ubuntu and i think Fedora keep their iso small enough to fit on Cd to the point of obsseive insanity (in many people's opinion apparently).  Cds have a much lower failure rate, especially the cheapest Cds for some weird reason.  Dvds use a higher burn speed.  I'm not sure why expensive Cds are worse.  Perhaps expensive are somehow optimised for storage rather than for booting but that sounds mad and unlikely. 

It's good to hear that there is a Windows version!  I think someone else had mentioned that but your post gave a bit more detail.
Thanks and regards from
Tom :)


From: Joakim Kargaard <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Cc: [hidden email]
Sent: Mon, 22 August, 2011 7:22:01
Subject: Re: [Evolution] Evolution for Windows

Hi Aleks,

Yes, there is a version for Windows, but looks to be only 32bit. Maybe someone else can correct me if I am wrong.

With regard to learning Linux, not really the right forum, but will try to help. It really depends on what you are thinking of learning. You could get a dvd of Ubuntu or Fedora and play around. That will give you an idea of what the GUI looks like. If you want to play on the command line, then there are plenty of online ebooks/tutorials on various commands that you can use. But to some degree it is distro specific. I would suggest making a choice on distro and then learning/asking questions from there.

Hope that helps.

Kim

On 08/20/2011 01:45 AM, Aleks Wolff wrote:

Is there version of Evolution that can be used in Windows? I have Win 7 x64. At least three times a year I want to learn Linux, but have not been successful. Is there a book that I can use to learn Linux.

 

Have a good weekend,

 

Thanks, Aleks

 

Dimex Sales, Inc.

P.O. Box 2776

Lodi, CA 95241

 

T. 209-334-1991 F. 209-644-6814 C. 209-484-7003

e-mail [hidden email]  www.dimexinc.com

 

 

DVBE/SB #31573

 

"SECOND TO NONE"

 

     Since 1986

 

_______________________________________________ evolution-list mailing list [hidden email] To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ... http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Patrick O'Callaghan
On 22 August 2011 05:43, Tom Davies <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi :)
Ubuntu and i think Fedora keep their iso small enough to fit on Cd to the point of obsseive insanity (in many people's opinion apparently).  Cds have a much lower failure rate, especially the cheapest Cds for some weird reason.  Dvds use a higher burn speed.  I'm not sure why expensive Cds are worse.  Perhaps expensive are somehow optimised for storage rather than for booting but that sounds mad and unlikely. 

Major Linux distros are all available on installation DVDs. For example Fedora is over 3GB currently. Perhaps you're thinking of Live CDs, which have a different purpose.

Also, please don't top-post on this list, and please don't post in HTML.

poc

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Evolution for Windows

Andre Klapper
In reply to this post by Akhil Laddha
On Mon, 2011-08-22 at 12:05 +0530, Akhil Laddha wrote:
> Evolution 3.0.2
> http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/windows:/mingw:/win32:/EXPERIMENTAL/openSUSE_Factory/noarch/
> Read
> http://fridrich.blogspot.com/2010/05/experimental-evolution-installer-for.html for how to install these rpms on windows


I've added this to http://projects.gnome.org/evolution/download.shtml
(should get updated within the next hours).

andre
--
mailto:[hidden email] | failed
http://blogs.gnome.org/aklapper | http://www.openismus.com

_______________________________________________
evolution-list mailing list
[hidden email]
To change your list options or unsubscribe, visit ...
http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/evolution-list
Loading...